Department

Editor's Notes

Hello everyone and welcome to another month of Legends Magazine. I've packed this issue with music. Anyone who can still say that the goth/industrial scene is dying is sorely mistaken, as is shown by the last few months of Legends. This month we fly out to Texas where there is an awesome collection of industrial bands just coming up and spend some time with Puncture. Then we swing by Arizona to talk to gothic rockers Audra. They have recently shown their expertise with a well-received track off of their latest "In a Dark Room…" release, "In Hollywood Tonight," a song written for and dedicated to the late Rozz Williams. Following this we stop by Vermont on the way back to talk to Margot Day, legendary in her New York period as front woman for post-punk group The Plague. Margot follows her own path now with her release of "Sacred!" on her Future Records label.

Admittedly, Legends concentrates on lesser known bands. They are the ones that, after all, need our help. But this issue Dan also covers some well known releases by Limp Bizkit and Skinny Puppy as well. I make my debut reviewing music by some of the bands mentioned in the above paragraph and also appear with my Off The Shelf series, continuing with Adams' famous Hitchhiker collection, as well. R. Patrick Murtha makes a two-way debut this month - and that's not even including his ghost story that also appears here. He begins his Ask Psiguy column this month and also debuts as an ambient/ethereal reviewer with his coverage of Mara's Torment's latest, "Across For Show."

So enjoy this issue kiddies. I believe it's one of our strongest yet and definitely destined to be one of the largest as well judging by the schedule drawn up for it. I wouldn't be surprised to be addressing you all in my Afterword on page 60-something. More review materials are rolling in and even books from publishers like Oak Tree Press as well…so we'll continue to report and review our scene from both a literary and musical point of view. Keep reading!

Oh, and as you can see - the goth/industrial music genre is far from dead. As a matter of fact, it's doing better than ever.

Peace, Love and All The Trimmings…

Marcus Pan
May 23rd, 1999 @ 3:05 in the AM